Revolution in Texas Book

Revolution in Texas


  • Author : Benjamin Heber Johnson
  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Release Date : 2003-01-01
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 268
  • ISBN 10 : 0300094256
  • Total Read : 76
  • File Size : 13,7 Mb

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Revolution in Texas Summary:

In Revolution in Texas, Benjamin Johnson tells the little-known story of one of the most intense and protracted episodes of racial violence in United States history. In 1915, against the backdrop of the Mexican Revolution, the uprising that would become known as the Plan de San Diego began with a series of raids by ethnic Mexicans on ranches and railroads. Local violence quickly erupted into a regional rebellion. In response, vigilante groups and the Texas Rangers staged an even bloodier counterinsurgency, culminating in forcible relocations and mass executions. eventually collapsed. But, as Johnson demonstrates, the rebellion resonated for decades in American history. Convinced of the futility of using force to protect themselves against racial discrimination and economic oppression, many Mexican Americans elected to seek protection as American citizens with equal access to rights and protections under the US Constitution.

Revolution in Texas Book

Revolution in Texas


  • Author : Benjamin Heber Johnson
  • Publisher : Yale University Press
  • Release Date : 2003-01-01
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 276
  • ISBN 10 : 0300109709
  • Total Read : 64
  • File Size : 11,9 Mb

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Revolution in Texas Summary:

A gripping narrative about a dramatic episode in the history of the American West--and a major contribution to our understanding of the origins of Mexican American identity In Revolution in Texas Benjamin Johnson tells the little-known story of one of the most intense and protracted episodes of racial violence in United States history. In 1915, against the backdrop of the Mexican Revolution, the uprising that would become known as the Plan de San Diego began with a series of raids by ethnic Mexicans on ranches and railroads. Local violence quickly erupted into a regional rebellion. In response, vigilante groups and the Texas Rangers staged an even bloodier counterinsurgency, culminating in forcible relocations and mass executions. Faced with the overwhelming forces arrayed against it, the uprising eventually collapsed. But, as Johnson demonstrates, the rebellion resonated for decades in American history. Convinced of the futility of using force to protect themselves against racial discrimination and economic oppression, many Mexican Americans elected to seek protection as American citizens with equal access to rights and protections under the U.S. Constitution.

Catarino Garza   s Revolution on the Texas Mexico Border Book

Catarino Garza s Revolution on the Texas Mexico Border


  • Author : Elliott Young
  • Publisher : Duke University Press
  • Release Date : 2004-07-05
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 424
  • ISBN 10 : 9780822386407
  • Total Read : 74
  • File Size : 10,7 Mb

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Catarino Garza s Revolution on the Texas Mexico Border Summary:

Catarino Garza’s Revolution on the Texas-Mexico Border rescues an understudied episode from the footnotes of history. On September 15, 1891, Garza, a Mexican journalist and political activist, led a band of Mexican rebels out of South Texas and across the Rio Grande, declaring a revolution against Mexico’s dictator, Porfirio Díaz. Made up of a broad cross-border alliance of ranchers, merchants, peasants, and disgruntled military men, Garza’s revolution was the largest and longest lasting threat to the Díaz regime up to that point. After two years of sporadic fighting, the combined efforts of the U.S. and Mexican armies, Texas Rangers, and local police finally succeeded in crushing the rebellion. Garza went into exile and was killed in Panama in 1895. Elliott Young provides the first full-length analysis of the revolt and its significance, arguing that Garza’s rebellion is an important and telling chapter in the formation of the border between Mexico and the United States and in the histories of both countries. Throughout the nineteenth century, the borderlands were a relatively coherent region. Young analyzes archival materials, newspapers, travel accounts, and autobiographies from both countries to show that Garza’s revolution was more than just an effort to overthrow Díaz. It was part of the long struggle of borderlands people to maintain their autonomy in the face of two powerful and encroaching nation-states and of Mexicans in particular to protect themselves from being economically and socially displaced by Anglo Americans. By critically examining the different perspectives of military officers, journalists, diplomats, and the Garzistas themselves, Young exposes how nationalism and its preeminent symbol, the border, were manufactured and resisted along the Rio Grande.

Matamoros and the Texas Revolution Book

Matamoros and the Texas Revolution


  • Author : Craig H. Roell
  • Publisher : Texas A&M University Press
  • Release Date : 2013-08-05
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 160
  • ISBN 10 : 9780876112663
  • Total Read : 72
  • File Size : 17,7 Mb

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Matamoros and the Texas Revolution Summary:

The traditional story of the Texas Revolution remembers the Alamo and Goliad but has forgotten Matamoros, the strategic Mexican port city on the turbulent lower Rio Grande. In this provocative book, Craig Roell restores the centrality of Matamoros by showing the genuine economic, geographic, social, and military value of the city to Mexican and Texas history. Given that Matamoros served the Mexican states of Tamaulipas, Coahuila and Texas, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosi, Zacatecas, Chihuahua, and Durango, the city’s strategic location and considerable trade revenues were crucial. Roell provides a refreshing reinterpretation of the revolutionary conflict in Texas from a Mexican point of view, essentially turning the traditional story on its head. Readers will learn how Matamoros figured in the Mexican government's grand designs not only for national prosperity, but also to preserve Texas from threatened American encroachment. Ironically, Matamoros became closely linked to the United States through trade, and foreign intriguers who sought to detach Texas from Mexico found a home in the city. Roell’s account culminates in the controversial Texan Matamoros expedition, which was composed mostly of American volunteers and paralyzed the Texas provisional government, divided military leaders, and helped lead to the tragic defeats at the Alamo, San Patricio, Agua Dulce Creek, Refugio, and Coleto (Goliad). Indeed, Sam Houston denounced the expedition as “the author of all our misfortunes.” In stark contrast, the brilliant and triumphant Matamoros campaign of Mexican General José de Urrea united his countrymen, defeated these revolutionaries, and occupied the coastal plain from Matamoros to Brazoria. Urrea's victory ensured that Matamoros would remain a part of Mexico, but Matamorenses also fought to preserve their own freedom from the centralizing policies of Mexican President Santa Anna, showing the streak of independence that characterizes Mexico's northern borderlan

Women and the Texas Revolution Book

Women and the Texas Revolution


  • Author : Mary L. Scheer
  • Publisher : University of North Texas Press
  • Release Date : 2012
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 244
  • ISBN 10 : 9781574414691
  • Total Read : 61
  • File Size : 14,8 Mb

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Women and the Texas Revolution Summary:

"Historically, wars and revolutions have offered politically and socially disadvantaged people the opportunity to contribute to the nation (or cause) in exchange for future expanded rights. Although shorter than most conflicts, the Texas Revolution nonetheless profoundly affected not only the leaders and armies, but the survivors, especially women, who endured those tumultuous events and whose lives were altered by the accompanying political, social, and economic changes.

New Orleans and the Texas Revolution Book

New Orleans and the Texas Revolution


  • Author : Edward L. Miller
  • Publisher : Texas A&M University Press
  • Release Date : 2004
  • Genre: Biography & Autobiography
  • Pages : 275
  • ISBN 10 : 9781603446457
  • Total Read : 62
  • File Size : 12,9 Mb

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New Orleans and the Texas Revolution Summary:

"Author Edward L. Miller has delved into previously unused or overlooked papers housed in New Orleans to reconstruct a chain of events that set the Crescent City, in many ways, at the center of the Texian fight for independence. Not only did Now Orleans business interests send money and men to Texas in exchange for promises of land, but they also provided newspaper coverage that set the scene for later American annexation of the young republic."--BOOK JACKET.

Causes and Effects of the Texas Revolution Book

Causes and Effects of the Texas Revolution


  • Author : Teppo Harasymiw
  • Publisher : The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
  • Release Date : 2010-01-01
  • Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
  • Pages : 32
  • ISBN 10 : 9781615325078
  • Total Read : 88
  • File Size : 10,5 Mb

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Causes and Effects of the Texas Revolution Summary:

The Texas Revolution was a defining moment not only for Texas, but also for the United States. Readers will learn about the events that led up to the war for independence from Mexico, as well as the far-reaching effects of the war. Biographical sidebars highlight key figures, and timelines compare what was happening in the United States to the dramatic events of the Texas Revolution.

The Spirit of Hidalgo Book

The Spirit of Hidalgo


  • Author : Suzanne B. Pasztor
  • Publisher : University of Calgary Press
  • Release Date : 2002
  • Genre: History
  • Pages : 241
  • ISBN 10 : 9781552380475
  • Total Read : 92
  • File Size : 18,5 Mb

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The Spirit of Hidalgo Summary:

This book fills a significant gap in the scholarship on the Mexican Revolution by providing a detailed history of the northeastern state of Coahuila from the late Portifirian era to 1920. It evaluates the social, political, and economic developments that contributed to revolutionary activity within Coahuila, and that helped shape the revolutionary movements led by Francisco I. Madero and Venustiano Carranza. Pasztor explores the role played by the extensive Coahuila-Texas border in the financing of the Mexican Revolution and she addresses the revolution's immediate outcomes through a study of the reforms introduced during the governorships of Carranza and Gustavo Espinosa Mireles.